Well, my Monday wasn't a bad day but it was intense for a while. I know I've told you all that I work in a community mental health center. I am a Case Manager and I am the person that individuals have the most contact with when they come in to see the doctor or need any other kind of service. Sometimes that service is just to provide a shoulder to cry/lean on and sometimes that service is to help a doctor provide emergency care.
Yesterday we had a young woman who had made a serious suicide attempt the night before come in to see the doctor. We've worried about her for a while because she is resistant to treatment and very depressed. She once again refused to go into the hospital and refused the offered medications all while saying she didn't want to live anymore. Now, anyone who has been alive in this century knows that once someone says they want to kill themselves or others, they can be committed (302'd is what we call it). The doctor left the office to notify the authorities (police must be involved in an involuntary committment) and the young woman and I chatted. I knew what was happening and felt anxious about it. When the policemen came in, and of course they were large men, I saw her body stiffen. But she went along and we escorted her to our crisis center. I walked next to her with my hand on her back to offer some reassurance. We signed her in and then I called her mother. When it was over, I felt drained even though it wasn't really all that dramatic. There is something about making someone do something against their will that is exhausting to me. I know in my heart it was the right thing to do but I also firmly believe individuals (who are coherent and thinking clearly) should be able to determine what they want to do with their own lives. If she were not depressed and still decided she did not want to live, I would support her decision. I might not understand it, but I would support it. Tough situation all around.
I didn't know that Australia had compulsory voting. I can't imagine that. Our election turn out is abysmal at best but I know if someone suggested people be required to vote, that person would be run out of town on a rail. We loves us our freedom, here in these United States, even if we don't know what to do with it sometimes.
Tonight is Debate number 2. Obama is ahead in the polls and the campaign ads are getting a little edgier. Only 4 more weeks to go. These last four weeks always seem endless. Oh, and I was misinformed when I said yesterday that it was the last day to register. It was the last day in Pennsylvania. States can set their own deadlines. I didn't know. Sorry.
And lastly, my oldest daughter now has sapphire colored hair. She told me she was getting her hair done on her way home from work yesterday and silly me, I thought she was getting the last of the purple rinsed out from Otakon in August. Instead, she had it dyed a deep purple/blue. It's cut in a cute style and the color is pretty, it'll just take some getting used to. I raised me some independent thinkers. Pk is lamenting that he has two blonde daughters and neither one of them has blonde hair at the moment. Em is a redhead and El is a bluehead. Kate, my brown haired daughter is wearing her natural color, for the moment. Who knows how long that will last? If they want to experiment, I'm glad it's with their hair which will grow back.
Well, I'm off to check the phone messages and emails that have accumulated overnight and start my work day. Have a good one everyone.

Comments

Bezzie said…
So therefore, we have the right NOT to vote as well. I wish more people understood this. Yes, ideally you should want to have a voice in which person represents your interests and the good of the country, but when faced with a pool where none of those people represent your interests or what you think is good for the country--is it so horrible NOT to vote?

Something I've been chewing on.
Em said…
I tend to think that anybody who doesn't vote gives up their right to complain about anything related to the person the rest of us put in office, since that person didn't voice their opinion. It gets tough to vote when you're picking the lesser of two evils, but it should be done if only to ensure the the lesser of those evils is chosen. One of my roomies elected not to vote, or even register this year, but I think that's more a case of generalized apathy than anything else. Which is funny, because there are a ton of issues coming up in this election that affect him. Anyway...

I'm sorry you had to have a client committed against her will, but I am very glad you were there with her. At least there was a comforting presence there for her during a scary, stressful time. You're a good lady, Momolla.
amy said…
Yes, Saturday was the last day to register in RI. I agree, if someone doesn't vote, they don't get to complain. However, you always have more choice than what's on the ballot. In 2000 and 2004 my husband and I both wrote in a candidate (and no, not something stupid like Mickey Mouse, an actual valid person we'd hoped would make the ballot, but didn't). I'm still exercising my choice, even if it's spitting in the wind. In RI, we all know which candidate is going to get our measly two electoral votes anyway: the Democrat. So anyone voting any other way is spitting in the wind anyway.
Dianne said…
I'm so glad that the young woman has you as a Case Mgr. It had to be tough on you, but it's the best thing for her.
Galad said…
I agree that the young woman was fortunate to have someone compassionate and calm to be with her at this tough time.

Hope you did something nice for yourself as a stress reliever :-)
Sheepish Annie said…
I've been a party to one or two of those tense situations in the mental health department and it is so stressful. It always feels to me that I've somehow betrayed the person, even if it is the right thing to do. I've never once had a client angry with me after it is all over, though. In fact, most have thanked me...

I've always believed that hair is just dead stuff on the top of your head and there to be played with. I like the idea of some blue in the tresses! Of course, my school administrators have never felt that way so I don't get to be that creative. ;)
Rose Red said…
It's interesting - how (some/all?) Americans think that compulsory voting might infringe on their freedoms. As was noted yesterday, compulsory voting doesn't mean you have to vote, it just means you have to turn up (or do an "absentee" or "postal" vote if you can't turn up on the day). But you know, different cultural backgrounds see things differently! I'm really glad our heritage has given us compulsory voting.

I'm sorry you had to have your client committed but I'm glad you were with her, I'm sure it helped.
Georgie said…
I have infinite admiration for you and your collagues, and the work you do DonnaLee. I know I could never be strong enough to do it, but that we need (sadly) more of you in our community. I hope your young client can find her way out of her black hole.

And as Rosered pointed out, its not compulsory to vote, just to turn up! I've done as Amy said, and made other choices in the past too, like not marking the ballot when I didnt suppoort any of the candidates.

I wish I had the courage to go blue too!
BigCat said…
It sounds like a tough day. My background is in case management from years back and I remember how I struggled when people's choice was taken from them. Sometimes it's all people have left.

Compulsory voting is a challenging dilemma. I would vote regardless but I do struggle with the idea of forcing people to do it.
Bells said…
You know it never occurred me to see compulsory voting as an infringement on freedom. How strange! I feel proud that I live in a country that deems it important to do so (even if not everyone actually votes) since it means hopefully more people take an interest, knowing they need to vote.

I think that sort of day would be very draining. It's greatly concerning to see someone suffer so.

Popular posts from this blog

Number. 4

And another one....